LIST OF PALAWAN  RESORTS





1.
Coral Bay Beach & Dive Resort  3-14
2.  KUBO LODGE AT LAMBINGAN BRIDGE (coming soon)











***  Other Palawan Hotels & Resorts Click Me  ***



Palawan Tourist Arrivals 2012  hit the 625,000+ mark
Palawan Tourists Projected Arrivals 2013 is  815,000+

Palawan Tourist arrivals are expected to increase further by 25 percent in 2012 and 2013 to around 625,489 and 815,611,

respectively. The province expects to breach the 1-million mark by 2014 when it will see a 30-percent growth in

tourist arrivals to around 1.060 million.

By 2015, the province hopes to see a 35-percent increase in tourist arrivals to around 1.431 million,

before breaching the 2-million mark by 2016. By the end of President Aquino’s term, the province believes it

will have a 40-percent increase in Palawan Tourist arrivals to 2.004 million.



Email us:                                                               
                                                                                                                                                Palawandotcom@gmail.com



Philippine Dept. Transportation to upgrade Palawan Night Landing Operations in Busuanga - Palawan  Airports

o

The Department of Transportation and Communications and Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines are inviting interested bidders for the P434.5 million worth of contracts for the supply of communications equipment and meteorological instruments and power supply system for these airports.

"This situation shows positive growth in the country’s economy; however congestion of arriving and departing aircraft in Manila’s premier airport is a dilemma of the air transport sector and needs to be addressed by the DOTC and CAAP,” the statement said.

In order to ease congestion at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport, the DOTC and CAAP agreed to upgrade the night landing operations of eight airports in accordance with International Civil Aviation Organization standards & recommended practices of the United Nations.



Abbamania’ goes to Palawan on Sunday on

April 21 2013

To celebrate Earth Day, Friends of Palawan Mayor Edward Hagedorn led by Rajan Gidwani are mounting a fund-raising show for Hagedorn’s proenvironment projects in the province. “Abbamania,” the official tribute concert featuring the music of legendary Swedish pop group Abba, will have a performance tomorrow at the Puerto Princesa Coliseum.

Hagedorn is known to have zealously campaigned for Puerto Princesa’s Underground River to be named as one of the 7 Wonders of Nature





MANILA, Philippines – Hollywood couple Patrick J. Adams and Troian Bellisario may have kept their Philippine destination a secret but the actor’s recent posts in one of his social networking accounts revealed where they are currently enjoying the sun.

Speaking before the entertainment press on Wednesday, Adams said he and Troian are going to “take off to some secret location to visit a beach somewhere for a while.”

Saying they just want to keep it quiet so they could relax, the “Suits” and “Pretty Little Liars” stars refused to tell the media where they are off to.

But in his official Instagram account on Thurday, Adams posted a picture of local ladies singing as they arrive in their “secret location.” This is supposedly the standard welcome to guests upon arrival at the El Nido airport.

Adams then posted a picture of a beach resort (seen above) which indicated that they are staying at El Nido Resorts in Lagen Island.

In the picture’s caption, Adams said: “Not leaving. Not ever.”

El Nido Resorts in Palawan is one of the most exclusive destinations in the Philippine province.

Its official website says “the resort offers a magnificent view of Bacuit Bay and the El Nido sunset. The surrounding forest and the breathtaking limestone cliffs are natural attractions that also serve as a sanctuary for a diverse variety of birds and mammals.”

Adams and Troian are currently in the country to promote their own television series, which also air here in the Philippines. The two said they also came to country to “have fun and swim

 
                                                                                                                                                                                  Welcome to  Palawan.com
                                                            Palawan.com  is  For Sale
                 
                                                                                                                                                    

                                                                          Palawan News & Philippine Islands News:  




"Cotton Wool/Buds/Pads in the Philippines" is now available at Fast Market ResearchUKPRwire (Press Release) 17:29
 
Cat found on freighter from Philippines to LA San Gabriel Valley Tribune, California 06:56
Philippines province loses power over unpaid bill Business Recorder, Pakistan 06:10

Philippines' surprisingly strong Q1 growth eclipses China's 
Philippines' top comedian apologizes for rape joke 
Scientific Drilling Opens Philippines Office  3 reasons behind Philippines' unexpected growth


 
 

 
 
Philippines boosts military to resist … 

The Philippines Needs to Apologize
Philippines approves 3 wind farm projects to generate 208MW of power  06:37

PNoy: Philippines open to fisheries talks (Video) 05:44
 
Philippines witnesses reverse migration 
India, Philippines are ‘top vegetable, fruit suppliers’ 










                                                          




Stranger Than Paradise

Will the Philippine government's ambitious plan to attract luxury tourism threaten the environmental wonders that have made the country one of the last unspoiled tropical destinations in Asia? Two islands—one pristine (Palawan),  the other overpopulated (Boracay) — sound a cautionary note.


                                                                                                                                                            Bacuit-Bay-Palawan
                                                                                                                                                            Bacuit  Bay in Palawan  Photography by Simon Watson

                                                                                                                                                            SEA WORTHY | A view of the Bacuit Bay archipelago, composed of 45 islands and located in the Philippine province of Palawan.

ASK THE AVERAGE WESTERNER what he knows about the Philippines and the reply will likely touch on Imelda Marcos's shoe collection, or Manny Pacquiao's knock-out record, or the Bataan Death March, or other things that don't necessarily scream "paradise."

For this, I am grateful. Arcing down toward El Nido, 260 air miles southwest of Manila, I gaze upon spectrums of seawater rarely observed in nature—Scope mouthwash deepening to Edge Shave Gel—and, in my experience, never before observed without American accents and steel-drum tunes ringing in my ears. The breathless reports I've heard of Bacuit Bay's gob-stopping natural beauty seem, if anything, to have under-hyped the vista passing beneath the plane.


Bacuit Bay, home to an archipelago of 45 islands bordering the South China Sea, occupies a place in the Filipino psychogeography like Alaska's in the American imagination: an unspoiled national Eden that few citizens ever get around to visiting. The bay sits at the northernmost tip of Palawan, the Philippines's most sparsely populated, westernmost province, which brands itself "the last frontier." The 19-seat turbo-prop charter to the bay's lone village, El Nido, is reportedly the most expensive domestic airfare in the Philippines. (An informal survey of my plane mates turns up zero Philippine passport holders and a predominance of Japanese and South Koreans.) But the view would seem to justify the ticket price: The bosky little ingots of land studding the bay seem to bear no trace of human settlement, and the blue-green tides are wholly unscarred by cruise ship or Jet Ski wakes.

The bay's welcome lack of development is partly an effect of environmental progressivism (in 1998, the government declared northern Palawan a protected area) and partly an emblem of the country's late-blooming tourism industry. Public perceptions, shaped by headline-grabbing earthquakes, typhoons and periodic kidnappings—mostly by Muslim extremists around the contested southern island of Mindanao—have helped chill leisure travelers' enthusiasm for the island nation. And, until recently, its roadways, airports and hotels simply couldn't support large numbers of visitors accustomed to first-world amenities. But in the hopes of winning a wedge of a market long dominated by Thailand and Bali, the Philippines has committed unprecedented sums to its infrastructure budgets—$9.6 billion in 2013—and undertaken an ambitious media campaign to help assuage its image problem.

The efforts appear to be bearing fruit. Fueled in part by the growing tourism industry, the nation's GDP swelled by 7.1 percent in the third quarter of last year, Asia's second-fastest growth rate, bested only by China. "There is no better time to be in the Philippines than now," says Robbie Antonio, managing director of Century Properties, a Manila real estate firm whose array of luxury construction projects includes Trump Tower, Makati City. "In our industry, demand for real estate has never been higher." In 2012, the Philippines received 4.3 million foreign visitors—more than twice its intake of travelers just a decade ago—inspiring a rash of media speculation that the nation's beach towns may soon go the way of Acapulco. In places like the Philippine island of Boracay, the transformation is well under way, so I head first to Bacuit Bay, to check out a diminishing rarity: a self-proclaimed tropical paradise that contains no go-kart tracks or daiquiri stands or much of anything but wild animals, water and sand.

As I climb off the boat, a pair of long-tailed macaques, whom I assume are on the payroll, rove the cliff face, sampling white flowers.

If, like me, you are not categorically keen on Southeast Asian beach resorts, it is probably because you have been to Thailand's Phuket or Krabi, where you sat on heel-hammered sands drinking a warm gin and tonic from a literal bucket, wishing you'd discovered the place before the invention of fire-spinning, Katy Perry and laser shows. But the Lagen Island Resort, where I fetch up after a 40-minute boat cruise, is not that sort of place. Situated on a remote and otherwise deserted island distinguished by serous limestone cliffs, Lagen has 50 private rooms, including a crescent of eight hip-roofed cottages poised on stilts in an oval of placid water that's the color of molten Coke bottles. Admission to this world of ecofriendly ease—the resort has its own desalination and power plants, and wastewater-processing technology—does come at a comparative premium. Cabanas here range from $400 to $650 per night, a relative fortune in a land where clean and comfortable beachfront accommodations abound at a tenth or so the price. As I climb off the boat, a pair of long-tailed macaques, whom I assume are on the payroll, rove the cliff face, sampling white flowers. In the perfect absence of thundering house music, the call of a lone, coarse-throated bird thunders like a foghorn.

Under the unwalled reception pagoda, frozen towels and glasses of gelid melon puree are put into our hands. We are gently instructed to set our mobile devices to vibrate for the duration of our stay. We are shown the beach, the slate-tiled saltwater pool and the al fresco cocktail shanty—phenomena my fellow travelers quietly moan over and photograph with reverent diligence. The temptation is strong to take to a lounger and lapse into basking-iguana consciousness. Instead, I submit to the activities director's recommendation to head out on a tour of Bacuit Bay's astonishments.

My guide, a friendly and knowledgeable young man named Angelo Gustillo, ferries me across the bay to a small lagoon, known locally as "the small lagoon," which you get to by kayaking through a narrow fissure in a limestone breaker. Here, I swim through a canyon filled with green water of such violent luminosity that it's like breaststroking through a radioactive Midori cocktail. Green waverings play on the high gray stone. Plashings and gaspings of a sparse pack of astounded tourists echo off canyon walls. I suffer a vague despair that I am neither Brooke Shields nor 13 years old.

Gustillo takes me snorkeling in a coral grove, going so far as to summon a crowd of gorgeous fish by chumming the water with hacked-up bits of less gorgeous ones. I see clown fish being gleefully tickled by anemones. I see schools of Day-Glo creatures that look like they were designed by Wes Anderson. I hear the snicky-snacky sound of coral breakfasting. He takes me spelunking through a Neolithic cave that is both prettier and tidier than my house. He brings me to the summit of a little mountain to take in a panorama of the bay and, with any luck, to spot some of Palawan's celebrity fauna: green sea turtles, dugongs, sharks, whale sharks and the world's most adorable ungulate, the Chihuahua-size Philippine mouse deer. At this point, I'm so surfeited on natural spectacles, it's faintly disappointing not to see a troupe of all these things executing Busby Berkeley maneuvers for my personal delectation.

Among Palawan's deep trove of wildlife, the most precious to the local economy, Gustillo explains, is the swiftlet, a small darting bird whose nests, built largely of its own spittle, are the essential ingredient in bird's nest soup. A swiftlet nest (nido in Spanish, hence El Nido's name) sells for upward of 200 Philippine pesos per gram ($2,265 a pound). A few years back, Gustillo eked out a dangerous living retrieving the nests from crevices high in the cliff faces. "So many of my friends died doing that kind of work," he says, explaining that nido hunters disdain safety harnesses. "That's how it is with many Philippine people. They do what they have to live." But in the name of social and ecological responsibility, Lagen's resort manager tells me later, the El Nido Resorts have made a point of hiring nido hunters away from the cliffs and into careers less hazardous for the swiftlets and for the hunters themselves.

LATE IN THE AFTERNOON, I return to Lagen Island. I laze around my handsome cabin. I laze some more on my private bayside veranda, gnawing a mango of life-altering excellence. I watch silvery small-fry dance and play across the water's surface. Then I reflect that they're not dancing and playing at all. A bigger fish is down there trying to murder them. But such is the weird, solipsistic derangement that starts to takes hold when you're in a place where the chief anxiety is the slowness with which the shadows grow on the shore-front chaises. When the light begins to fail, a staffer announces that the sun will soon be going down. My fellow guests and I get excited about the rotation of the planet as though it were an impromptu performance by Tom Jones. We board a sunset-watching vessel and stare at the big Clingstone peach in the western sky. The fiery lacuna the sun burns into my field of vision somehow feels like a valuable memento.

Sumptuous though Lagen Island is, it seems a poor relation compared to Pangulasian, westward across the bay. After a fire razed the property a few years back, Pangulasian underwent a ground-up restoration, completed in October 2012. The result is a property nearly unsettling in its opulence. Accommodations at Pangulasian range from $800 per night for a beachfront cabana, to $3,300 per night for an eight-person suite of villas equipped with a private infinity pool. During my visit, the staff is still making refinements. One of these is a plan to query guests in advance as to their music and fragrance preferences, and moments before arrival, to flood the cabana with, for example, gardenia and Metallica.

At sunset, I sit on a balcony with Pangulasian's manager, Lei Policarpio, dining on sea bass and foie gras–whipped potatoes, watching the sun perform. I mention to Policarpio my strange new understanding of the sun—Sol the product, Mister Tom Jones.

She nods. "Yes, the sun is a product," noting that the island's east-west orientation treats the guest to two solar recitals per day. "The beach is a product, too." Then she frowns, looking down on the glowing strand. In her opinion, the product could be handsomer. Too many bits of shell and coral litter the sand.

"You could have it sieved," I suggest unseriously.

"We're going to try with rakes," but if the rakes don't do the trick, says Policarpio, she will have the beach sieved.

IF PALAWAN - BACUIT BAY FEELS like the Philippines's best-kept travel secret, its worst-kept secret is the island of Boracay, in the region of Visayas, a 40-minute flight south from Manila. Seen from above, such a profusion of windsurfers and parasails mob the limeade-tone shallows that the island looks besieged by moths. The flourlike beaches of Boracay, a narrow oddment of land a brief boat ride from the mainland town of Caticlan, have drawn throngs of foreigners since the '80s. Its years of hard use aren't difficult to detect. Not many acres of this 10-square mile island remain unclaimed by hotels or houses and golf courses. The few remaining postage-stamp size wildernesses are staked with "for sale" signs. Boracay's main attraction is the White Beach, a 2.5-mile stretch of bright sand along the island's west coast. When I first arrive, I have some difficulty finding it. The beach, as it turns out, is hiding behind a long bulwark of commercial establishments, including but not limited to: the Obama Grill (slogan: "You want good food? Yes we can!"); a shooters bar inviting patrons to accept its "still standing after 15 [shots]" challenge; the Facebook Resort; a shopping mall; and an uncountable number of T-shirt vendors, massage touts and diving tour agencies.

Visiting Boracay after Palawan admittedly subjects the place to an unfair comparison. Still, I'm pleased that Palawan's enviro-protected status has prevented people from erecting shooter bars on the hawksbill turtles' nesting beds. Shouldering through the White Beach's Times Square–density throngs, it's hard to greet happily those elements of tourist culture that have already dimmed the appeal of places like Phuket: pedicurists plucking at your sleeves; Russian tourists dancing Gangnam-style at a beachfront club; restaurants lit with so much neon they look like rides at the state fair; Wilford Brimley lookalikes dining wordlessly with young Filipinas whom one can only optimistically suppose are mail-order brides.

According to press reports, the island is beginning to suffer serious ill-effects of its own popularity. The relentless foot traffic notwithstanding, hotels and seawalls built too close to the beach are contributing to the quickening erosion of Boracay's beaches. In recent years, boat anchors and heedless divers have helped kill off much of the surrounding hard coral. Leakage from below-code septic systems has been known to taint the beach sands. Among Boracay's service-sector workers, nervous rumors circulate that the environmental authorities plan to shutter the island for a season or two to let its ecosystem convalesce.

Down by D Mall, the White Beach's retail epicenter, I pause to chat with boat tour operators Rene Plemones and Reynald Bernardo, who fret that the island and their livelihood may fall victim to its own success. "The development is a problem here in Boracay," Plemones says. "There are so many tourists, and so many hotels doing violations to the environment. How long will the tourists want to come here? We don't know."


An official I queried at the Philippines Department of Tourism claimed not to have heard of any plans to close the island, but the rumor is regrettably familiar to Plemones and Bernardo. "Maybe it's going to happen," says Bernardo. But even a rest-cure isn't likely to restore Boracay to its former preeminence, he says. "Boracay used to be number one, but now number one is Palawan. It's the best island because of the nature. Boracay cannot be Palawan."


Bacuit-Bay-Palawan2

Bacuit Bay in  Palawan

Fair enough. But even here on Boracay, I ask, is there maybe someplace to, you know, dodge the tourists and get off the beaten track? Plemones muses, shakes his head. "I don't know about something like that."

But, the White Beach is not devoid of appeal. And at mealtimes, it's well worth wending your way to the fish market, or talipapa, at the center of the labyrinthine D Mall. Here, for a modest sum, you can snag a fresh-caught fish or a still-gesticulating crab, which you then take to one of the half-dozen or so "cooking service" restaurants surrounding the market. A capable chef will flay and cook your catch to order. Eating your weight at the talipapa plaza is a wise thing to do.

One afternoon, I ask my guide, a young man named Yeng, if he might help me track down some less tourist-friendly fare. He gives me an uncertain look. "Have you eaten balut?" Balut, for reasons that soon become clear, is a dish whose sale and consumption are forbidden on the White Beach. We head inland, and soon come across a plywood shelter full of local guys watching television, one of whom has a crate of it.

Shouldering through the White Beach's Times Square—density throngs, it's hard to greet happily those elements of tourist culture that have already dimmed the appeal of places like Phuket.

Balut is an unborn duckling scalded in its shell, apparently, before hatching. By way of instruction, Yeng eats one first. He peels the shell, douses the occupant with vinegar and knocks it back, unchewed, like an oyster shot. My turn. A tittering mob gathers. I peel my egg and see a beak, an eye and some matted black down. Steady on, down the hatch. Okay, a couple of problems: First of all, the notion of swallowing something with such an obvious face does not inspire my throat to open for business; second, "duckling" seriously understates the creature's weight class. Lodged halfway down my gullet, the thing feels like a condor. A boa constrictor would have a hard time managing.

About halfway past my tonsils, the bird makes a break for it and flies toward the light and into my palm. I give it an unceremonious burial behind the television shack. For the better part of a week, I will feel its ghost impression on my uvula, but it's hard to regret any experience that gives a dozen rubbernecking strangers the gift of helpless, tearful laughter.


My last full day on the island, I am still hung up on the idea of finding a spot less traveled by my fellow tourists. In my guidebook, I find mention of a local attraction that seems like it might be underattended: a bat cave near Ilig-Iligan Beach, on Boracay's less-populous eastern shore. Even Yeng has never ventured there, which seems a good sign. He arranges for us to double (or, more accurately, triple) helmetless on a stranger's wimpy-looking scooter. We rocket terrifyingly through traffic, swinging away from the hotel strip, through a simple village where the houses are sheet-metal shelters. The paving peters out, and the road dead-ends at a band of green ocean.

Yeng and I climb through a fence of rusted barbed wire, down to a beach of brilliant white, thrillingly free of humanity. At the north end, Yeng finds a pair of barefoot kids in a cabin enclosed by a driftwood fence. They're maybe eight and ten years old, but they know about the bat cave and agree to take us there. They lead us up an eroded bank, past a couple of "No Trespassing" signs, through a dense patch of woods to a forbidding hole in the ground. It is dusk, and my plan is to hang around by the mouth of the cave until the bats burst forth in a huge photogenic plume, but the children go in. I follow, down and down over guano-slicked rocks, the descent getting scarier and less hygienic by the instant. I try to tell the kids that I've gone deep enough, that really, I'm just waiting for the bats to fly out, you know, to perform, like Mister Tom Jones.

"No," one of the boys says.

"What? They don't fly out at sunset? All bats fly out at sunset."

"No," he says cryptically.

The unseen bats are shrieking, evidently enraged at the intrusion. They howl and wheel but stay hidden in the dark. The light at the cave's mouth begins to fail. My guide is right. These creatures, who've presumably been here since before the arrival of the first tourist boat, have no intention of putting on a show. I respectfully withdraw, climbing up into the twilight, down to the empty beach, where I wash my hands in the sea.



******************************************************


Wall Street Journal  article laments over-development of Boracay

Posted at 04/11/2013 12:59 PM

MANILA, Philippines – Several travel magazines and websites may have praised Boracay for being one of the best beach destinations in the world today, but an article recently published in the Wall Street Journal lamented how the island has suffered from over-development.

In an article titled “Stranger than Paradise,” writer Wells Tower noted how Boracay has become the Philippines’ “worst-kept secret,” adding that it has “those elements of tourist culture that have already dimmed the appeal of places like Phuket.”

Tower was referring to a beach destination in neighboring Thailand which is said to be also suffering from over-development.

“Seen from above, such a profusion of windsurfers and parasails mob the limeade-tone shallows that the island looks besieged by moths. The flourlike beaches of Boracay, a narrow oddment of land a brief boat ride from the mainland town of Caticlan, have drawn throngs of foreigners since the ‘80s. Its years of hard use aren’t difficult to detect. Not many acres of this 10-square mile island remain unclaimed by hotels or houses and golf course. The few remaining postage-stamp size wildernesses are staked with ‘for sale’ signs,” he wrote.

“Boracay’s main attraction is the White Beach, a 2.5-mile stretch of bright sand along the island’s west coast. When I first arrive, I have some difficulty finding it. The beach, as it turns out, is hiding behind a long bulwark of commercial establishments, including but not limited to: the Obama Grill (slogan: ‘You want good food? Yes we can!’); a shooters bar inviting patrons to accept its ‘still standing after 15 [shots]’ challenge; the Facebook Resort; a shopping mall; and an uncountable number of t-shirt vendors, massage touts and diving tour agencies.”

He added: “Shouldering through the White Beach’s Times Square – density throngs, it’s hard to greet happily those elements of tourist culture that have already dimmed the appeal of places like Phuket: pedicurists plucking at your sleeves; Russian tourists dancing Gangnam-style at a beachfront club; restaurants lit with so much neon they look like rides at the state fair; Wilford Brimley lookalikes dining wordlessly with young Filipinas whom one can only optimistically suppose are mail-order brides.”

Despite this, Tower stressed that Boracay’s White Beach “is not devoid of appeal.” He then cited the “talipapa,” or beach market, where guests can have freshly caught seafood cooked to order.

Still, he had a hard time looking for some “less tourist-friendly fare.”

“My last full day on the island, I am still hung up on the idea of finding a spot less traveled by my fellow tourists,” he wrote before going to a bat cave near Boracay’s less populous Ilig-Iligan beach.

The government is planning to demolish at least 80 structures in Boracay to save the island from erosion.

But the governor of Aklan, the province where Boracay is located, is not very happy with the idea, saying that this may take a toll on local businesses.

On Palawan

While he is not pleased with what he saw in Boracay, Tower was all praises for Palawan, particularly Lagen Island Resort in El Nido and nearby Pangulasian Island.

He said that unlike Boracay, Palawan is a “diminishing rarity,” describing it as “a self-proclaimed tropical paradise that contains no go-kart tracks or daiquiri stands or much of anything but wild animals, water and sand.”

“I’m pleased that Palawan’s enviro-protected status has prevented people from erecting shooter bars on the hawksbill turtles’ nesting beds,” he wrote

********************************************



14 km. Sugary white sand Long Beach in San Vicente Palawan - Next boom Beach

                                                                                                                                     Lost in Long Beach, Palawan:

                                                                                                                               Longest Beach in the Philippine Islands


                                                                                      SANVICENTE-LONGBEACH-PALAWAN

                                   San Vicente spans a huge land area of 1,657 square kilometers with a population of only 25,218 people, which translates to only 15.2 people per square kilometer!

                                              While Boracay Island‘s almost 4-kilometer of powdery white beach front is getting more congested, San Vicente’s 14-kilometer spectacle is a potential alternative destination for sun bathers and beach lovers.

                                              Dubbed as “Long Beach,” it lies between barangays New Agutaya and Alimanguhan, and is definitely worth a visit for its sheer length.

                                   I have high suspicions that San Vicente is one of those towns that are classified as “first class municipalities” due to the technicality of its massive land area. The poblacion is hardly

                                   a testimony of any large scale industries/commercial activities in town.

                                   It was very laidback in San Vicente with the basic modern conveniences.

                                  Why go to San Vicente, Palawan? To see Long Beach, reputedly, the longest white sand beach in the Philippines!  When was still thinking about doing a 12-day trip

                                  to Palawan I initially only had 3 items on my list: Honda Bay, El Nido, and the Underground River.

                                  While I could have been more than happy to have spent all my time in just these place, I wanted to know if there were other nice places to visit in the area.

                                  San Vicente’s Long Beach fit snugly into my plan since the town is located

                                  along the way between Puerto Princesa and El Nido.

                                   I was so happy I made that decision because Long Beach did not disappoint. Long Beach wasindeed freakin’ long, 14km as claimed by the townsfolk.

                                    It was so surreal to see such a beautiful white sand beach seemingly stretching endlessly into the horizon yet devoid of any huge beach resorts, tourists, or loud bars YET. Soon Resorts will be sprouting here like in Boracay.

                                  San Vicente, Palawan, the home of the next Boracay. Having been dubbed as the next best tourist destination in the Philippines after its completion of the 3 Kilometer runway airport, San Vicente will cater to beachgoers, tourist, vacationers,

                                  and visitors from both local and international. The airport will have a direct flight from Bali, Kota Kinabalo, Bangkok, Shanghai, Neijing, tokyo, Seoul and other Asian tourist locations


                                  The San Vicente Palawan airport is nearing completion. The 300 million peso development should will greatly enhance access to new developments being built on the 14 kilometer beach. Politicians that own a good deal of the land should prosper.

                                  Hailed as the next major beach destination in the Philippines, Long Beach in San Vicente, Palawan has an incredible 14 kilometers of unadulterated beach.  Lately, land prices have risen

                                  five times in value as the area gears up for development. An air strip is being planned as San Vicente is a grueling 4 hours drive away from

                                  Palawan’s capital city of Puerto Princesa and 2 hours away

                                  from the world famous El Nido.


Major players have bought the beach and an enormous airport is been built nearby. I think that San Vicente will outstrip Boracay in 20 years. Who am I but a nobody, but logic would dictate that
Boracay has already reached its maximum capacity
with water and Sewage disposal.

El Nido of  Palawan    Year of  2100

  PALAWAN.COM

TUBBATAHA.COM

TUBBATAHA MAP




                                                                                                                                                                                                         


Paradise of Palawan


Banol Beach Palawan


Paradise-Palawan


Paradise of Palawan





 
EMAIL:  Palawandotcom@GMAIL.COM

  Paradise of El Nido Palawan

 






Paradise of Palawan





Palawan VacationBaragatan Festival of Palawan


Study of world's richest marine area shows size matters February 21, 2013 Various kinds of corals grow in the marine protected area of Honda Bay located in Puerto Princesa on October 27, 2008 Enlarge Various kinds of corals grow in the marine protected area of Honda Bay located in Puerto Princesa, the capital of Palawan island in western Philippines on October 27, 2008. A new study of Asia's Coral Triangle, which contains nearly 30 percent of the world's reefs, shows that when it comes to ensuring a rich and diverse range of species, size matters. A new study of Asia's Coral Triangle, which contains nearly 30 percent of the world's reefs, shows that when it comes to ensuring a rich and diverse range of species, size matters. Ads by Google Marine Fish Store - Shop PetSmart® To Find Quality Fish & Aquiarum Supplies Today! - PetSmart.com/FishSupplyStore "The study suggests that marine protected areas should be as large and diverse as possible," Peter Etnoyer, a marine biologist at the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), said in a statement Thursday. Etnoyer, who co-authored the study published by open access peer-reviewed scientific journal PLoS ONE, stressed that providing more protected marine space made it possible to "include more species, more habitats, and more genetic diversity to offer species the best chance of adapting to sea temperature and other environmental changes." The Coral Triangle covers a triangular area stretching across the Philippines, eastern Sabah, eastern Indonesia, East Timor, Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands. It's sheer size has made it a treasure trove of marine life—it contains nearly 30 percent of the world's reefs and more than 3,000 species of fish and is often referred to as the "Amazon of the seas". The fact that its size, according to Thursday's study, is also what will help it adapt to change is important, since previous reports have shown that more than 85 percent of the reefs there are considered to be threatened by human activities like coastal development, pollution and overfishing. The Coral Triangle that covers Indonesia, the Philippines and Papua New Guinea Enlarge The Coral Triangle that covers Indonesia, the Philippines and Papua New Guinea. A new study of Asia's Coral Triangle, which contains nearly 30 percent of the world's reefs, shows that when it comes to ensuring a rich and diverse range of species, size matters. For the study, scientists at NOAA, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), Old Dominion University in Virginia and the Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies had "analysed over 10,000 maps of marine species," said Jonnell Sanciango, the head author of the study and a researcher at Old Dominion. They had "found that habitat, calculated as coastline length, was the best predictor of species richness, followed by the variety of habitats and sea surface temperature," she added. Ads by Google Singapore Airlines ® - We've Set the Standard for Luxury Global Travel. Book Now! - www.SingaporeAir.com Their research led them to suggest stretching the borders of the Coral Triangle further to also include Brunei, Singapore and peninsular Malaysia, "to ensure that these areas are included in the management and conservation of the region." The study also found that sea surface temperature plays an important role in the proliferation of marine life. This suggests that "climate change may have a direct impact on species diversity," the authors said in the statement. "The conservation implication is that if climate change raises sea temperatures it may have a profound influence on evolution rates and how species are distributed over time," Kent Carpenter of IUCN said.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-02-world-richest-marine-area-size.html#jCp

Study of world's richest marine area shows size matters February 21, 2013 Various kinds of corals grow in the marine protected area of Honda Bay located in Puerto Princesa on October 27, 2008 Enlarge Various kinds of corals grow in the marine protected area of Honda Bay located in Puerto Princesa, the capital of Palawan island in western Philippines on October 27, 2008. A new study of Asia's Coral Triangle, which contains nearly 30 percent of the world's reefs, shows that when it comes to ensuring a rich and diverse range of species, size matters. A new study of Asia's Coral Triangle, which contains nearly 30 percent of the world's reefs, shows that when it comes to ensuring a rich and diverse range of species, size matters. Ads by Google Marine Fish Store - Shop PetSmart® To Find Quality Fish & Aquiarum Supplies Today! - PetSmart.com/FishSupplyStore "The study suggests that marine protected areas should be as large and diverse as possible," Peter Etnoyer, a marine biologist at the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), said in a statement Thursday. Etnoyer, who co-authored the study published by open access peer-reviewed scientific journal PLoS ONE, stressed that providing more protected marine space made it possible to "include more species, more habitats, and more genetic diversity to offer species the best chance of adapting to sea temperature and other environmental changes." The Coral Triangle covers a triangular area stretching across the Philippines, eastern Sabah, eastern Indonesia, East Timor, Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands. It's sheer size has made it a treasure trove of marine life—it contains nearly 30 percent of the world's reefs and more than 3,000 species of fish and is often referred to as the "Amazon of the seas". The fact that its size, according to Thursday's study, is also what will help it adapt to change is important, since previous reports have shown that more than 85 percent of the reefs there are considered to be threatened by human activities like coastal development, pollution and overfishing. The Coral Triangle that covers Indonesia, the Philippines and Papua New Guinea Enlarge The Coral Triangle that covers Indonesia, the Philippines and Papua New Guinea. A new study of Asia's Coral Triangle, which contains nearly 30 percent of the world's reefs, shows that when it comes to ensuring a rich and diverse range of species, size matters. For the study, scientists at NOAA, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), Old Dominion University in Virginia and the Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies had "analysed over 10,000 maps of marine species," said Jonnell Sanciango, the head author of the study and a researcher at Old Dominion. They had "found that habitat, calculated as coastline length, was the best predictor of species richness, followed by the variety of habitats and sea surface temperature," she added. Ads by Google Singapore Airlines ® - We've Set the Standard for Luxury Global Travel. Book Now! - www.SingaporeAir.com Their research led them to suggest stretching the borders of the Coral Triangle further to also include Brunei, Singapore and peninsular Malaysia, "to ensure that these areas are included in the management and conservation of the region." The study also found that sea surface temperature plays an important role in the proliferation of marine life. This suggests that "climate change may have a direct impact on species diversity," the authors said in the statement. "The conservation implication is that if climate change raises sea temperatures it may have a profound influence on evolution rates and how species are distributed over time," Kent Carpenter of IUCN said.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-02-world-richest-marine-area-size.html#jCp


Tubbataha of Palawan
Study of world's richest marine area shows size matters



Various kinds of corals grow in the marine protected area of Honda Bay located in Puerto Princesa on October 27, 2008 Various kinds of corals grow in the marine protected
area of Honda Bay located in Puerto Princesa,
 the capital of Palawan island in western Philippines on October 27, 2008.
 A new study of Asia's Coral Triangle, which contains nearly 30 percent of the world's reefs,
shows that when it comes to ensuring a rich and diverse range of species, size matters.
"


Various kinds of corals grow in the marine protected area of Honda Bay located in Puerto Princesa, the capital of Palawan island in western Philippines on October 27, 2008.
A new study of Asia's Coral Triangle, which contains nearly 30 percent of the world's reefs,
 shows that when it comes to ensuring a rich and diverse range of species, size matters.


A new study of Asia's Coral Triangle, which contains nearly 30 percent of the world's reefs, shows that when it comes to ensuring a rich and diverse range of species, size matters.


Study of world's richest marine area shows size matters February 21, 2013 Various kinds of corals grow in the marine protected area of Honda Bay located in Puerto Princesa on October 27, 2008 Enlarge Various kinds of corals grow in the marine protected area of Honda Bay located in Puerto Princesa, the capital of Palawan island in western Philippines on October 27, 2008. A new study of Asia's Coral Triangle, which contains nearly 30 percent of the world's reefs, shows that when it comes to ensuring a rich and diverse range of species, size matters. A new study of Asia's Coral Triangle, which contains nearly 30 percent of the world's reefs, shows that when it comes to ensuring a rich and diverse range of species, size matters. Ads by Google Marine Fish Store - Shop PetSmart® To Find Quality Fish & Aquiarum Supplies Today! - PetSmart.com/FishSupplyStore "The study suggests that marine protected areas should be as large and diverse as possible," Peter Etnoyer, a marine biologist at the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), said in a statement Thursday. Etnoyer, who co-authored the study published by open access peer-reviewed scientific journal PLoS ONE, stressed that providing more protected marine space made it possible to "include more species, more habitats, and more genetic diversity to offer species the best chance of adapting to sea temperature and other environmental changes." The Coral Triangle covers a triangular area stretching across the Philippines, eastern Sabah, eastern Indonesia, East Timor, Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands. It's sheer size has made it a treasure trove of marine life—it contains nearly 30 percent of the world's reefs and more than 3,000 species of fish and is often referred to as the "Amazon of the seas". The fact that its size, according to Thursday's study, is also what will help it adapt to change is important, since previous reports have shown that more than 85 percent of the reefs there are considered to be threatened by human activities like coastal development, pollution and overfishing. The Coral Triangle that covers Indonesia, the Philippines and Papua New Guinea Enlarge The Coral Triangle that covers Indonesia, the Philippines and Papua New Guinea. A new study of Asia's Coral Triangle, which contains nearly 30 percent of the world's reefs, shows that when it comes to ensuring a rich and diverse range of species, size matters. For the study, scientists at NOAA, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), Old Dominion University in Virginia and the Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies had "analysed over 10,000 maps of marine species," said Jonnell Sanciango, the head author of the study and a researcher at Old Dominion. They had "found that habitat, calculated as coastline length, was the best predictor of species richness, followed by the variety of habitats and sea surface temperature," she added. Ads by Google Singapore Airlines ® - We've Set the Standard for Luxury Global Travel. Book Now! - www.SingaporeAir.com Their research led them to suggest stretching the borders of the Coral Triangle further to also include Brunei, Singapore and peninsular Malaysia, "to ensure that these areas are included in the management and conservation of the region." The study also found that sea surface temperature plays an important role in the proliferation of marine life. This suggests that "climate change may have a direct impact on species diversity," the authors said in the statement. "The conservation implication is that if climate change raises sea temperatures it may have a profound influence on evolution rates and how species are distributed over time," Kent Carpenter of IUCN said.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-02-world-richest-marine-area-size.html#jCp

 
The study suggests that marine protected areas should be as large and diverse as possible," Peter Etnoyer, a marine biologist at the US National Oceanic
and Atmospheric Administration
(NOAA), said in a statement Thursday.
Etnoyer, who co-authored the study published by open access peer-reviewed scientific journal stressed that providing more protected marine space made it possible to "include morespecies,
 more habitats, and more genetic
diversity to offer species
the best chance of adapting to sea temperature and other environmental changes.

The Coral Triangle covers a triangular area stretching across the Philippines, eastern Sabah, eastern Indonesia, East Timor, and the Solomon Islands.
It's sheer size has made it a treasure trove of marine life—it contains nearly 30 percent of the world's reefs and more than 3,000 species of fish and is
often referred to as the "Amazon of the seas".

The fact that its size, according to Thursday's study, is also what will help it adapt to change is important, since previous reports have shown that more than 85 percent of the
reefs there are considered to be threatened
by human activities like coastal development, pollution and overfishing.


Corals of Palawan
The Coral Triangle that covers Indonesia, the Philippines and Papua New Guinea" "The Coral Triangle that covers Indonesia, the Philippines and Papua New Guinea. A new study of Asia's Coral Triangle,
 which contains nearly 30 percent of the world's reefs, shows that when it comes to ensuring a rich and diverse range of species, size matters.
"

The Coral Triangle that covers Indonesia, the Philippines and Papua New Guinea.
A new study of Asia's Coral Triangle, which contains nearly 30 percent of the world's reefs,
shows that when it comes to ensuring a rich and diverse range of species, size matters.
For the study, scientists at NOAA, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN),
Old Dominion University in Virginia and
the Harte Research Institute
for Gulf of Mexico Studies had "analysed over 10,000 maps of marine species,"
 said Jonnell Sanciango, the head author of the study and a researcher at Old Dominion.

They had "found that habitat, calculated as coastline length, was the best predictor of species richness, followed by the variety of habitats and sea surface temperature" she added.


Their research led them to suggest stretching the borders of the Coral Triangle further to also include Brunei, Singapore and peninsular Malaysia, "to ensure that these areas are included in the management
and conservation of the region."

The study also found that sea surface temperature plays an important role in the proliferation of marine life.
This suggests that "climate change may have a direct impact on species diversity," the authors said in the statement.
"The conservation implication is that if climate change raises sea temperatures it may have a profound influence on evolution rates and how species are distributed over time," Kent Carpenter of IUCN said.







 



****************************




Lagen Island. Photo from Patrick J. Adams official Instagram account

MANILA, Philippines – Hollywood couple Patrick J. Adams and Troian Bellisario may have kept their Philippine destination a secret but the actor’s recent posts in one of his social networking accounts revealed where they are currently enjoying the sun.

Speaking before the entertainment press on Wednesday, Adams said he and Troian are going to “take off to some secret location to visit a beach somewhere for a while.”

Saying they just want to keep it quiet so they could relax, the “Suits” and “Pretty Little Liars” stars refused to tell the media where they are off to.

But in his official Instagram account on Thurday, Adams posted a picture of local ladies singing as they arrive in their “secret location.” This is supposedly the standard welcome to guests upon arrival at the El Nido airport.

Adams then posted a picture of a beach resort (seen above) which indicated that they are staying at El Nido Resorts in Lagen Island.


In the picture’s caption, Adams said: “Not leaving. Not ever.”

El Nido Resorts in Palawan is one of the most exclusive destinations in the Philippine province. Boracay have No Match to Palawan

Its official website says “the resort offers a magnificent view of Bacuit Bay and the El Nido sunset. The surrounding forest and the breathtaking limestone cliffs are natural attractions that also serve as a sanctuary for a diverse variety of birds and mammals.”

Adams and Troian are currently in the country to promote their own television series, which also air here in the Philippines. The two said they also came to country to “have fun and swim.


********************



I



Bruno’s Swissfood in Puerto Princesa, Palawan

Bruno’s Swissfood in Puerto Princesa, Palawan


Bruno’s Swissfood in Puerto Princesa, Palawan


Bruno’s Swissfood in Puerto Princesa, Palawan

Right in the center of Puerto Princesa, locals and visitors find a slice of Europe, with Australian and American leanings. Bruno’s Swissfood, a deli, store and restaurant, owned by Bruno Eyer, has been a landmark

on the Puerto scene for 20 years or more. Bruno, a Swiss-German,

and his Filipina wife, stock all kinds of imported goodies, and feed hungry people, right across from Mendoza Park, on Valencia Street, a half-block off Rizal Avenue.





*  For Resort Room Bookings -
Please Email the Palawan Resort Directly "See below"

* Foreigner who want to Purchase a Palawan Tropical Paradise Island -

Please Email Me:
PalawanDotcom@gmail.com

* Palawan Resort owner & Palawan Businesses who want to Advertise with Palawan.COM -

Please Email Me:
PalawanDotcom@gmail.com




'Revenge' star tweets about Palawan vacation 2013


MANILA – While recent visits by Hollywood stars to the Philippines became front-page news, it seems another international celebrity sneaked in quietly for a vacation.

On Monday, Hollywood actress Emily VanCamp of the TV show "Revenge" tweeted about her “most relaxing” holiday experience in the country.

Posting a picture of her vacation, VanCamp said: “Thank you to the AMAZING staff at Amanpulo in the Philippines for the most relaxing, gorgeous holiday.”

She even used the hashtag “paradise” to describe the Palawan island.'

Emily VanCamp @EmilyVanCamp

Thank you to the AMAZING staff at Amanpulo in the Philippines for the most relaxing, gorgeous holiday. pic.twitter.com/HjoH57C1gk

Immediately after her post, the tweet was already “retweeted” more than 160 times, and was “favorited” by more 160 people

Emily VanCamp @EmilyVanCamp

Sister hug in paradise ☀ pic.twitter.com/6c9KQsFp1B


 Emily VanCamp and her sister Katie during their vacation in Palawan. Photo from Katie VanCamp's Instagram account VanCamp is the lead star of the hit American series “Revenge,” which tells the story of Emily Thorne, as she returned to the Hamptons to seek revenge on the people who destroyed her life and her father’s life.
Aside from “Revenge,” reports said VanCamp will also star in Marvel's “Captain America: The Winter Solider.”


  Emily VanCamp and her sister Katie during their vacation in Palawan. 2013 Photo from Katie VanCamp's Instagram account







ACTRESS-ACTOR VACATION IN PALAWAN

Philippine Actress Angelica, John Lloyd enjoy 'Best Summer 2013' in Palawan


John Lloyd Cruz and Angelica Panganiban spend the Holy Week break in Palawan. Photo from Angelica Panganiban's 

MANILA – After saying that they don’t get to spend so much time together because of their hectic schedules, it seems that celebrity couple John Lloyd Cruz and Angelica Panganiban finally had the chance to be with each other.

In her official Instagram account, Panganiban shared several photos of her and Cruz while they were on a vacation at the Ariara Resort in  Palawan during the Holy Week break.

First, Panganiban posted a solo picture of Cruz with the caption “The guy in pink,,, is still... The guy in pink.. D na sya nakapag palit since then :)”

Cruz was also wearing pink in the memorable "Perfect Sunday" photo in August last year when Panganiban first hinted that there is something romantic going on between her and the actor.

The actress then posted a collage of pictures showing Cruz with her family. “Hanapin nyo kami!!!!! This is life!! Wala pa man!!” she said.

She then posted a series of photos of her and Cruz where she expressed her love for him.

“Sabi nila,,, its lonely at the top... pero kung ikaw naman ang kasama ko, bongga na din :) #AriaraPrivateIsland your the best lab!!!” she said.

Panganiban also said she’s having the “best summer ever,” as she is spending it with the love of her life.

“Doing sit ups love? Hehehe.. you always give me memories and more more wisdom, lalo na pag malalim na ang hugot natin :) best summer ever! Sa maraming aspeto :)” Panganiban said.

“Been working out for a couple of days :) hiking everyday!!! Ang payat payat na ni love ko!!!! Holidays with family.. #AriaraPrivateIsland” she added.

Ariara island, known for its 600-meter white sand beach and uninterrupted views of the sea, ranked first in the Top 100 holiday destinations list of the British edition of Vogue magazine last year.

Ariara, dubbed as a "private paradise," has only eight spacious villas and beach cottages. All furniture used here are made by Filipino carpenters and craftsmen using indigenous materials.


Huma Resort SeaPlane

Huma Resort Sea Plane


HUMA ISLAND in PALAWAN

Fashion designer Rajo Laurel and socialite Divine Lee preferred the quiet ambience of Huma Island in Palawan.


“Peace & paradise!” Mr Rajo Laurel said in Twitter.

Bigger than Amanpulo", that's what the insider told me. With 85 sea view villas that are promising their future guests to feel a total surrender to mother nature with services only reserved for the kings

Huma Resort-Palawan

Mövenpick Hotels & Resorts announces that it is to manage Huma Island resort – a private island in the heart of the stunning archipelago of Palawan Province in the Philippines.
The island is world famous among divers who visit to experience the area’s exceptional corals and abundant marine life as well as to explore 12 of the most iconic shipwrecks of the mid-20th century.
Huma Island itself is also steeped in mystical magic from the tip of its rainforest-covered mountains to the bottom of its primeval caves.

The endless pristine sands that ring the island were once home to “Ibrahim The Sailor” who was swept ashore 1352 when his galleon Huma was shipwrecked while on its way from India to China. Ibrahim may be long gone but his legend and his ship’s name live on.

Respectful of such a unique and mystical setting, the new Mövenpick Resort & Spa Huma Island is the only resort on the island and when it opens in the final quarter of 2012 it will feature 80 over-water bungalows.

There will be a choice of six restaurants offering Lebanese, Italian, Asian and Seafood cuisine as well as
an entertainment room,

Huma library,

Huma fitness centre and a six-treatment-room spa with glass floors so relaxing
guests can enjoy the marine life below.


Huma Resort Room in Palawan


Huma Resort Bath Room


Huma Resort at Night


Huma Resort with Grilled Palawan Tuna :)



The Huma resort in  Palawan will be having 5 different restaurants, an exposition of global cuisine that will cater to your palette, each impeccable, and uniquely owned.



Guests will arrive in paradise in unparalleled style, aboard onto a state of the art learjet, ultimate in luxury and convenience.  With highly qualified staff and FAA certified pilots, a VIP transport of business and leisure travelers.






Palawan Tourist Arrivals 2012  hit the 625,000+ mark
Palawan Tourists Projected Arrivals 2013 is  815,000

Palawan Tourist arrivals are expected to increase further by 25 percent in 2012 and 2013 to around 625,489 and 815,611, respectively. The province expects to breach the 1-million mark by 2014 when it will see a 30-percent growth in tourist arrivals to around 1.060 million.

By 2015, the province hopes to see a 35-percent increase in tourist arrivals to around 1.431 million, before breaching the 2-million mark by 2016. By the end of President Aquino’s term, the province believes it will have a 40-percent increase in Palawan Tourist arrivals to 2.004 million.


MANILA, Philippines - Puerto Princesa Mayor Edward Hagedorn said they expect tourist arrivals to hit the 600,000 mark 2012

“Last year’s tourist arrivals went to a record breaking 515,148, a 60-percent increase from 2011r. We are really happy about the news. Half are Filipino balikbayans and half are foreigners. Imagine from a few flights in 1992, we now have 123 flights a week, excluding international airports,” Hagedorn told The STAR during a recent visit.    

“In fact, we have to stop our advertisements because the airport can’t handle it (passenger arrivals). We have so many flights but we are already addressing the problem,” Hagedorn said.

He said the Puerto Princesa airport would be modernized and renovated to accommodate the surge of tourists.

“The airport’s privatization will be bid (out) this year and Koreans have already expressed interest,” Hagedorn said.

With regard hotel accommodation, Hagedorn said they now have a total of 146 hotels, a far cry from the few inns dotting the city in 1992.

“When I first assumed in 1992, there were only four lonely travel and tour operators in the city. Now there are close to 200 hotels. It has increased by 2,950 percent since 20 years ago,” he said.

Palawan Tourist arrivals have swelled from 14,249 in 1992 to 515,148 in 2011, a staggering 3,515 percent jump.

Hagedorn stressed that because the tourism infrastructure and attractions are already in place, Tourist inflows to Puerto Princesa City stand to grow to 1.3 million by 2016 and by 2025, arrivals will reach an all-time high of 2.5 million.

Puerto Princesa’s gain has been attributed to the phenomenal success of the Puerto Princesa Underground River, which was named one of the New 7 Wonders of Nature.

“Everything changed when the Puerto Princesa Underground River was declared as one of the new seven wonders of the world,” Hagedorn said.

PPUR won over a number of natural wonders owing to the systematic campaign launched by Hagedorn, with support from President Aquino himself, the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR), the Department of Tourism (DOT) and the Department of the Interior and Local Government (DILG).

Aquino and Hagedorn collaborated in appealing to all Filipinos here and abroad to text or email their votes for PPUR. With more than 30 million text votes registered for PPUR, the site won overwhelmingly.

“Having surged significantly over the past 20 years, tourism dollars are financing progress in the city – from irrigation covering over 2,000 hectares, nursery and propagation farms for high-value seedlings, farm implements benefiting 17,000 farmers, to government housing programs, more roads, more schools, more for public healthcare and more for building blocks for fish and marine sanctuaries,” Hagedorn reported.


After its Underground River had been named one of the new seven wonders of nature, Palawan again grabbed global attention, this time by making it to a well-known travel website's recommended destinations.

Lonely Planet called Palawan the "ultimate archipelago for adventurers" as it ranked the group of islands 8th in a list of top 10 travel regions for 2013.

"Palawan incorporates thousands of sparkling, rugged islands and is fringed by 2000km of pristine coastline," the website said.

EL NIDO AT NIGHT
EL NIDO,  PALAWAN   NIGHT  LIFE

EUROPEAN TOURISTS IN EL NIDO - PALAWAN
EUROPEAN TOURISTS  in  EL NIDO,  PALAWAN


Email us before its too late & to find out:
Palawandotcom@gmail.com
Palawan Tourist Arrivals 2012  hit the 625,000+ mark
Palawan Tourists Projected Arrivals 2013 is  815,000

Palawan Tourist arrivals are expected to increase further by 25 percent in 2012 and 2013 to around 625,489 and 815,611, respectively. The province expects to breach the 1-million mark by 2014 when it will see a 30-percent growth in tourist arrivals to around 1.060 million.

By 2015, the province hopes to see a 35-percent increase in tourist arrivals to around 1.431 million, before breaching the 2-million mark by 2016. By the end of President Aquino’s term, the province believes it will have a 40-percent increase in Palawan Tourist arrivals to 2.004 million.



MANILA, Philippines - Puerto Princesa Mayor Edward Hagedorn said they expect tourist arrivals to hit the 600,000 mark 2012

“Last year’s tourist arrivals went to a record breaking 515,148, a 60-percent increase from 2011r. We are really happy about the news. Half are Filipino balikbayans and half are foreigners. Imagine from a few flights in 1992, we now have 123 flights a week, excluding international airports,” Hagedorn told The STAR during a recent visit.    

“In fact, we have to stop our advertisements because the airport can’t handle it (passenger arrivals). We have so many flights but we are already addressing the problem,” Hagedorn said.

He said the Puerto Princesa airport would be modernized and renovated to accommodate the surge of tourists.

“The airport’s privatization will be bid (out) this year and Koreans have already expressed interest,” Hagedorn said.

SANGAT RESORT IN PALAWAN

With regard hotel accommodation, Hagedorn said they now have a total of 146 hotels, a far cry from the few inns dotting the city in 1992.

“When I first assumed in 1992, there were only four lonely travel and tour operators in the city. Now there are close to 200 hotels. It has increased by 2,950 percent since 20 years ago,” he said.

Palawan Tourist arrivals have swelled from 14,249 in 1992 to 515,148 in 2011, a staggering 3,515 percent jump.

Hagedorn stressed that because the tourism infrastructure and attractions are already in place, Tourist inflows to Puerto Princesa City stand to grow to 1.3 million by 2016 and by 2025, arrivals will reach an all-time high of 2.5 million.

Puerto Princesa’s gain has been attributed to the phenomenal success of the Puerto Princesa Underground River, which was named one of the New 7 Wonders of Nature.

“Everything changed when the Puerto Princesa Underground River was declared as one of the new seven wonders of the world,” Hagedorn said.

PPUR won over a number of natural wonders owing to the systematic campaign launched by Hagedorn, with support from President Aquino himself, the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR), the Department of Tourism (DOT) and the Department of the Interior and Local Government (DILG).

Aquino and Hagedorn collaborated in appealing to all Filipinos here and abroad to text or email their votes for PPUR. With more than 30 million text votes registered for PPUR, the site won overwhelmingly.

“Having surged significantly over the past 20 years, tourism dollars are financing progress in the city – from irrigation covering over 2,000 hectares, nursery and propagation farms for high-value seedlings, farm implements benefiting 17,000 farmers, to government housing programs, more roads, more schools, more for public healthcare and more for building blocks for fish and marine sanctuaries,” Hagedorn reported.


After its Underground River had been named one of the new seven wonders of nature, Palawan again grabbed global attention, this time by making it to a well-known travel website's recommended destinations.

Lonely Planet called Palawan the "ultimate archipelago for adventurers" as it ranked the group of islands 8th in a list of top 10 travel regions for 2013.

"Palawan incorporates thousands of sparkling, rugged islands and is fringed by 2000km of pristine coastline," the website said.

"Throw in the mushrooming growth of style-conscious boutique hotels normally found in places like Ko Samui or Bali, and you can feel that Palawan is ready to hit the big-time in 2013," it added.



14 km. Sugary white sand Long Beach in San Vicente Palawan - Next boom Beach

Lost in Long Beach, Palawan:

Longest Beach in the Philippines

SANVICENTE-LONGBEACH-PALAWAN

San Vicente spans a huge land area of 1,657 square kilometers with a population of only 25,218 people, which translates to only 15.2 people per square kilometer!

While Boracay Island‘s almost 4-kilometer of powdery white beach front is getting more congested, San Vicente’s 14-kilometer spectacle is a potential alternative destination for sun bathers and beach lovers.

Dubbed as “Long Beach,” it lies between barangays New Agutaya and Alimanguhan, and is definitely worth a visit for its sheer length.

I have high suspicions that San Vicente is one of those towns that are classified as “first class municipalities” due to the technicality of its massive land area. The poblacion is hardly a testimony of any large scale industries/commercial activities in town.

It was very laidback in San Vicente with the basic modern conveniences.

Why go to San Vicente, Palawan? To see Long Beach, reputedly, the longest white sand beach in the Philippines!  When was still thinking about doing a 12-day trip to Palawan I initially only had 3 items on my list: Honda Bay, El Nido, and the Underground River.

While I could have been more than happy to have spent all my time in just these place, I wanted to know if there were other nice places to visit in the area. San Vicente’s Long Beach fit snugly into my plan since the town is located along the way between Puerto Princesa and El Nido.

I was so happy I made that decision because Long Beach did not disappoint. Long Beach wasindeed freakin’ long, 14km as claimed by the townsfolk.

It was so surreal to see such a beautiful white sand beach seemingly stretching endlessly into the horizon yet devoid of any huge beach resorts, tourists, or loud bars YET. Soon Resorts will be sprouting here like in Boracay.

San Vicente, Palawan, the home of the next Boracay. Having been dubbed as the next best tourist destination in the Philippines after its completion of the 3 Kilometer runway airport, San Vicente will cater to beachgoers, tourist, vacationers, and visitors from both local and international. The airport will have a direct flight from Bali, Kota Kinabalo, Bangkok, Shanghai, Neijing, tokyo, Seoul and other Asian tourist locations


The San Vicente Palawan airport is nearing completion. The 300 million peso development should will greatly enhance access to new developments being built on the 14 kilometer beach. Politicians that own a good deal of the land should prosper.

Hailed as the next major beach destination in the Philippines, Long Beach in San Vicente, Palawan has an incredible 14 kilometers of unadulterated beach.  Lately, land prices have risen five times in value as the area gears up for development. An air strip is being planned as San Vicente is a grueling 4 hours drive away from Palawan’s capital city of Puerto Princesa and 2 hours away from the world famous El Nido.


Major players have bought the beach and an enormous airport is been built nearby. I think that San Vicente will outstrip Boracay in 20 years. Who am I but a nobody, but logic would dictate that Boracay has already reached its maximum capacity with water and Sewage disposal.



EL NIDO AT NIGHT
EL NIDO,  PALAWAN   NIGHT  LIFE

EUROPEAN TOURISTS IN EL NIDO - PALAWAN
EUROPEAN TOURISTS  in  EL NIDO,  PALAWAN


Beauty of El Nido Palawan


Palawan   Sweetest Natural Mango Shake

Puerto Princesa Airport
Puerto Princesa Airport in  PALAWAN

Bus to EL NIDO PALAWANPALAWAN BUS DEPARTURE TIME
EL NIDO of PALAWAN AIRCON BUS at 6am
Puerto Princesa to El Nido Travel time is 6 hours by aircon bus


One of them was the former tribal council of Survivor U.S.A.


Secret Lagoon is located next to a secluded area that was occupied by Survivor Sweden.



PALAWAN  VICTORY  PALAWAN

COOL PALAWAN
COOL  PALAWAN



We also passed by Turtle Island that is now off limits to tourists.  Before, turtle eggs have been regularly stolen by tourists visiting the island so the local government closed it to the public to protect the turtles






Magische Momente im Naturwunder Palawan

Bizarre Felsformationen, blühende Unterwasserwelten und eines der „neuen sieben Naturwunder der Erde“ – die philippinische Insel Palawan verspricht unvergessliche Augenblicke


Puerto Princesa – Langsam hebt die Wasserschildkröte ihren Kopf. Ihr Blick wirkt müde, aber wer weiß schon, wie ein müder Schildkrötenblick aussieht? Vor wenigen Minuten ist die große Panzerechse am Strand des Coconut Garden Island Resort aufgetaucht. Im Schutz der Nacht hat sie sich den Weg an die Uferböschung gebahnt. Aber ihr Landgang ist nicht unbemerkt geblieben. In Windeseile hat sich die Kunde in der kleinen Bungalow-Anlage verbreitet. Fasziniert beobachten die rund 15 Resortgäste jetzt, wie die Schildkröte mit ihren Flossen in mühsamer Kleinarbeit den Sand beiseite schaufelt, um schließlich ihre Eier zu legen. Jeder Einzelne genießt schweigend dieses bezaubernde Naturschauspiel. Der schwache Schein einer Taschenlampe ist auf das Tier gerichtet – im Hintergrund das Rauschen des Meeres, darüber ein funkelnder Sternenhimmel.

Es sind magische Momente wie dieser, die von einer Reise in Erinnerung bleiben. Und Palawan bietet eine Vielzahl an Möglichkeiten, solche Augenblicke zu erleben. Die drittgrößte Insel der Philippinen erstreckt sich schlangenförmig über 425 Kilometer bis an die Nordspitze Borneos. Ihr „Rückgrat“ bildet eine fast ebenso lange Gebirgskette, auf deren Hängen dichter tropischer Regenwald wuchert. Aus diesem Grund ist Palawan für philippinische Verhältnisse sehr dünn besiedelt. Einzig in der Provinzhauptstadt Puerto Princesa herrscht rege Betriebsamkeit. Im Vergleich zu anderen asiatischen Städten geht es aber selbst dort eher beschaulich zu.

Wer nach einem rund einstündigen Flug von der Metropole Manila hier ankommt, wird erstaunt sein, wie einfach es ist, sich zurechtzufinden. Unzählige Trycicles, so heißen die landesüblichen Motorradtaxis, tuckern die breite Hauptstraße entlang. 50 Pesos, umgerechnet rund einen Euro, kostet eine Fahrt durch die halbe Stadt, mit den oft einfallsreich bemalten Gefährten. Beim Streifzug durch Puerto Princesa ergibt sich auch schon mal das eine oder andere Pläuschen mit Einheimischen. Die Menschen sprechen wie fast überall auf den Philippinen gutes Englisch und wirken Besuchern gegenüber aufgeschlossen und interessiert.


Allgegenwärtig ist der tiefe katholische Glaube, der auf die spanische Kolonialzeit zurückgeht. Mit der blauen Kathedrale – der bekanntesten Sehenswürdigkeit der Stadt – steht in Puerto Princesa ein eindrucksvolles Zeugnis dieser Ära. Empfehlenswert ist auch ein Besuch auf dem Markt, um die lokale Küche kennen zu lernen und das eine oder andere preiswerte Souvenir zu ergattern. Aber die wahren Schätze Palawans offenbaren sich einem erst jenseits der Stadtgrenzen.

Nach dreistündiger Busfahrt, auf den Philippinen übrigens ein Erlebnis für sich, erreicht man den „Subterranean River National Park“. Der in dichtem Dschungel gelegene Park beherbergt eines der im Jahr 2012 gekürten „neuen sieben Naturwunder der Welt“ – den längsten schiffbaren Untergrund-Fluss. Über eine Länge von sieben Kilometern hat das Wasser ein verzweigtes Höhlensystem in das Karstgestein gefressen. An der höchsten Stelle liegt das Deckengewölbe atemberaubende 45 Meter über dem Wasserspiegel. Kurz vor der Mündung ins Meer schlängelt sich der Fluss durch einen Mangrovenwald, der eine ungeheure Vielfalt an Vögeln und Schmetterlingen beherbergt. Häufig sind auch Langschwanz-Makakenaffen zu sehen, die sich artistisch von Baum zu Baum schwingen.

Während in vielen anderen philippinischen Provinzen Naturschutz weiterhin ein Problem darstellt, hat sich Palawan seit einigen Jahren verstärkt dem Ökotourismus verschrieben. Die Auswirkungen dieser Initiative sind vor allem unter Wasser klar zu sehen: Blühende Korallenriffe, die einerseits den Fischbestand sichern und andererseits die Herzen von Schnorchlern und Tauchern höherschlagen lassen. Eine wunderbare Möglichkeit, die facettenreiche Unterwasserwelt zu erforschen, bietet der Inselarchipel rund um das vom Massentourismus verschont gebliebene Fischerdörfchen Port Barton. Wer Glück hat, sieht neben Fischen in allen Größen und Farben auch Rochen oder Meeresschildkröten.

Apropos Schildkröten. Inmitten dieser traumhaften Meereswelt liegt das eingangs erwähnte Coconut Garden Island Resort. Auf der sonst unbewohnten Insel Cacnipa haben der Schweizer Henry und seine philippinische Frau Dora eine Bungalow-Anlage aufgebaut, die das Prädikat paradiesisch verdient. Hohe Kokospalmen in einem gepflegten Garten bilden die perfekte Kulisse für den weißen Sandstrand. Das glasklare Wasser schimmert türkisblau. Im Restaurant werden neben fangfrischem Fisch und lokaler Küche auch Schweizer Spezialitäten serviert.


PALAWAN SUNSET

Vor 18 Jahren hat Henry begonnen, das Resort aufzubauen. „Damals war Palawan noch touristisches Niemandsland“, erzählt er. „Es gab kaum Straßen, alles ging nur mit dem Boot. Erst als vor ein paar Jahren die ersten Luxushotels die Gegend im Norden für sich entdeckten, wurde auch massiv in die Infrastruktur investiert.“

Mit der „Gegend im Norden“ meint Henry die Tourismushochburg El Nido. Während der Hochsaison ist in dem Ort von der Ursprünglichkeit Palawans leider nicht mehr viel zu sehen. Jeden Morgen verlassen Hunderte Boote den Hafen, um Scharen von Touristen zu den bizarren Felseninseln des Bacuit Archipels zu bringen. Wer den Massen ausweichen will, sollte deshalb keine der vorgefertigten Touren im Reisebüro buchen, sondern ein Boot chartern, um die steil aus dem Meer ragenden Karstinseln zu erforschen.

Bei genauerer Betrachtung wird aber schnell klar, warum sie so beliebt sind. Zwischen dem scharfkantigen, dunklen Gestein blitzen immer wieder kleine weiße Sandstrände auf. Eine Landschaft, die kontrastreicher nicht sein könnte.

Und dann taucht er plötzlich auf: dieser kleine Spalt im Fels. Der Entdeckergeist gerät in Wallung. Ein Sprung vom Boot ins Wasser, ein paar Kraulschläge – hinein in eine versteckte Lagune von unbeschreiblicher, wilder Schönheit. Da ist er wieder: Dieser magische Moment, der eine Reise unvergesslich macht.


El Nido of Palawan






Paradise of  Palawan

El Nido, Palawan Islands

In Asia, White Beach topped the “best beaches” list, followed by Agonda Beach in India and Railay Beach in Thailand. Other Philippine entries include the Secret Lagoon Beach in El Nido, which ranked ninth; and Yapak Beach in Boracay, which landed in 10th place.

These lists of best beaches are included in TripAdvisor’s Travelers’ Choice 2013 awards, which were “chosen by millions of travelers.” Other categories include best hotels and best hotels for romance.




PALAWAN DOCKS


PALAWAN VIEW


PALAWAN


FRISBEE IN  PALAWAN


 WOW  PALAWAN


WOW PALAWAN


EL NIDO OF PALAWAN

CORON  PALAWAN


EL NIDO PALAWAN


EL NIDO PALAWAN


EL NIDO PALAWAN VIEW FROM AIRCON BUS


EL NIDO OF PALAWAN - EUROPEANS ENJOYING CLEAR TROPICAL WATER